CRIMINAL LAWYERS
Toll free: 1(866) 243-6161 | Local:(416) 297-7200 brown@danielbrownlaw.ca

Blog: Understanding Canadian Criminal Law

Legal Commentary

Appealing A Provincial Offences Act Conviction

Appealing A Provincial Offences Act Conviction

How To Appeal Your Provincial Offences Act Conviction or Sentence in Toronto, Ontario. Are you looking to hire a lawyer to appeal your Provincial Offences Act conviction or sentence in Toronto, Ontario or elsewhere in the Greater Toronto Area? This article is intended...

Failing to Stop or Remain at the Scene of an Accident

Failing to Stop or Remain at the Scene of an Accident

This article provides a brief summary of the law in relation to the offence of failing to stop or failing to remain at the scene of a traffic accident (section 320.16 of the Criminal Code). In most provinces, a provincial driving statute such as the Ontario Highway...

Firm Update on COVID-19 and Updates on Court Closures

Firm Update on COVID-19 and Updates on Court Closures

The lawyers at Daniel Brown Law continue to closely monitor the COVID-19 situation. As always, our priority is the health and well-being of our firm members, clients, and community. To do our part to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19, effective Monday, March 16,...

Publishing An Intimate Image Without Consent

Publishing An Intimate Image Without Consent

Since 2015, publishing an intimate image of someone else without their permission is a crime in Canada. Section 162.1 of the Criminal Code captures all ways in which intimate images may be shared, including through physical delivery, social networking, email, or other...

How to Defend Voyeurism Charges

How to Defend Voyeurism Charges

Voyeurism Lawyer Toronto Voyeurism was added to the Criminal Code of Canada in 2005 to address a concern that new technologies could be used to more easily spy on people secretly for sexual purposes.  A voyeurism conviction can cause irreparable harm to a person's...

Winning Your Criminal Appeal With Fresh Evidence

Winning Your Criminal Appeal With Fresh Evidence

A criminal appeal lawyer is often required to prepare an appeal by relying solely on the evidence presented during the trial. In some cases, the appeal lawyer can present new evidence to the appeal court.  This can assist in getting the court to overturn a conviction...

Canada’s Sexual Offender Registry

Canada’s Sexual Offender Registry

Since 2004, Canadian Courts have required those found guilty of certain sex related crimes be registered in a sexual offender database. The Sexual Offender Information Registry Act (SOIRA) imposes obligations for those placed on the National Sex Offender Registry to...

Defending Sexual Exploitation Charges

Defending Sexual Exploitation Charges

With consent, it is not illegal in Canada to have a sexual relationship with someone older than sixteen years of age, regardless of the age difference between the two parties. An exception to this rule occurs when the sexual relationship exists between someone holding...

When Can Police Enter Your Home?

When Can Police Enter Your Home?

The ruling of R. v. Zargar, 2014 ONSC 1415 affirms that police cannot generally enter a person’s home without permission except under very limited circumstances. The case also establishes that a person can use a reasonable amount of physical force to remove a police...

Considering immigration consequences on sentencing

Considering immigration consequences on sentencing

Earlier this week, the Supreme Court of Canada released their ruling in R. v. Pham 2013 SCC 15 which answers the question, “What weight should be given to collateral immigration consequences in sentencing?” Mr. Pham was not a Canadian citizen. He was convicted at...

Public Mischief Charges in Canada

Public Mischief Charges in Canada

It is a crime in Canada to cause a police officer to enter on or continue an investigation with the intent to mislead them in any of the following scenarios: (a) making a false statement that accuses some other person of having committed an offence; (b) doing anything...

Understanding the Defence of Entrapment in Canada

Understanding the Defence of Entrapment in Canada

The police will often act covertly in an undercover capacity in order to investigate criminal activity. Rarely, the police will go too far in their undercover investigations and actually induce an otherwise law-abiding person into committing a crime such as...

How your criminal conviction can impact your civil lawsuit

How your criminal conviction can impact your civil lawsuit

It is often understood that a criminal conviction may significantly impact a person's future employment and travel opportunities. However, most people facing criminal charges are unaware how a conviction may impact their ability to bring or defend a civil lawsuit...

Ending house arrest for various criminal and drug offences

Ending house arrest for various criminal and drug offences

Conditional sentencing, introduced in Canada in September 1996, allows for sentences of imprisonment to be served in the community, rather than in a correctional facility. Conditional sentences normally include a period of house arrest but may also include graduated...

Self Defence: a person attacked in the home need not retreat

Self Defence: a person attacked in the home need not retreat

Earlier this week, the Ontario Court of Appeal released their ruling in R. v. Docherty, 2012 ONCA 784. The central issue in Docherty was whether the trial judge improperly instructed the jury that a person under attack has a duty to retreat from their home in order to...

Corporal Punishment in Canada – to spank or not to spank?

Corporal Punishment in Canada – to spank or not to spank?

This article attempts to clarify to what extent parents or teachers can physically discipline children under their care. Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada, enacted in 1892, provides parents, teachers and caregivers — including babysitters and foster parents —...

Call Now ButtonCall now! (416) 297-7200